Image credit: flickr.com/Boa-Franc

Many people already realize that certain parts of the country suffer from poor air quality at specific times of the year. People are so concerned about the air outside that many fail to consider the quality of the air inside their homes. In some cases, the air inside a house can be exponentially worse than what’s outside. Don’t have a bad air day; check the air quality inside your home and take action to make it better. 

What Causes Bad Air Indoors?

The air inside your home is directly affected by the quality of air outside the home. In addition to the regular pollutants found in the air outside, indoor air can be laden with cleaning solvents, viruses, fungi, formaldehyde, and all kinds of other pollutants. Pollen and dander can come in from windows and doors. Pets carry hair and saliva, in addition to airborne fecal matter. Paints, perfumes, and even chemicals on a new piece of furniture affect the quality of air inside your home. This may be even more noticeable if you have family members who suffer from allergies or respiratory problems. How can you combat the bad air?

Change Your Filters

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The ductwork in your home should have filters connected to it. These filters are supposed to help keep contaminants out. Over time, however, the filters become dirty from all of the contaminants they catch. This means that they need to be changed regularly in order to be most effective. Filters should be changed at least every six months, and your AC should be tuned up one to two times per year. Dust around the duct registers or settling on furniture around your home is a clear sign that not only your filters need changing, but you should probably also have your ducts examined and cleaned.

Go Green—Literally

Changing out your filters can dramatically improve your indoor air quality, but don’t underestimate the power of plants. There are many indoor plants such as spider plants, snake plants, English ivy, pothos, philodendrons and more that help to pull formaldehyde and a variety of other pollutants out of the air, replacing them with oxygen. If your home is lacking a little bit of green, then invest in some air-purifying plants strategically placed around your home.

Turn Bad Air Good

It’s possible to avoid a bad air day with proper air filter replacement and duct cleaning. Air-purifying plants are also beneficial if anyone in your family suffers from allergies or other respiratory issues. If you notice an inordinate amount of dust around your home or family members who are sneezing and coughing more than normal, then it’s time to take action.